AzureSearch

Cognitive Search – Azure Search with AI

Cognitive Search

Today, at Microsoft //build conference we announced Cognitive Search. You may wonder what is Cognitive Search. To put it as simple as possible: it’s Azure Search powered by Cognitive Services (Azure Machine Learning APIs). You remember when you wanted to run some intelligence over your data with Cognitive Services? You had to handle creating, e.g., Text Analytics API, then writing code that would take your data from database, issue request to API (remember to use proper key!), serialize, deserialize data and put result in your database?

Now, with Cognitive Search, you can achieve that by checking one checkbox. You just need to pick a field on which you want to run analytics, and which cognitive services or skills (1 cognitive service usually contain multiple skills) to run. As for now we support 6 skills:

  1. Key phrases
  2. People
  3. Places
  4. Organizations
  5. Language
  6. OCR (Optical Character Recognition)

We output results directly to your search index.

Creating Intelligent Search Index

To take advantage of Cognitive Search you need to create Azure Search service in South-Central US or in West Europe. More regions coming soon!

To create search index powered by cognitive services you need to use ‘import data’ flow. Go to your Azure Search Service and click on ‘Import data’ command:

Cognitive Search - step 1

Then pick your data source (MSSQL, CosmosDB, blob storage etc.). I will choose sample data source that contains real estate data:

Cognitive Search - import data

Now, you need to pick a field on which you want to run analytics. I will choose description. You also need to choose which cognitive services (skills) you want to run, and provide output field names (fields to which we will output cognitive services analysis result):

Cognitive Search - skillset definition

In the next step you need to configure your index. Usually you want to make fields retrievable, searchable, and filterable. You may also consider making them facetable if you want to aggregate results. This is my sample configuration:

Cognitive search - define index

In the last step you just need to configure indexer – a tool that synchronizes your data source with your search index. In my case I will choose to do synchronization only once, as my sample data source will never change.

Cognitive Search - create indexer

After indexer finish you can browse your data, and cognitive services results in search explorer.

Cognitive Search - browse

You can also generate more usable search UI for your data with AzSearch.js.

Generating UI to search data with AzSearch.js

If you don’t like browsing your data with search explorer in Azure Portal that returns raw JSON, you can use AzSearch.js to quickly generate UI over your data.

The easiest way to get started is to use AzSearch.js generator. Before you start, enable CORS on your index:

Cognitive search - CORS

Once you get your query key and index definition JSON paste it into generator together with your search service name, and click ‘Generate’. An html page with simple search interface will be created.

Cognitive Search - AzSearch.js

This site is super easy to customize. Providing html template for results change JSON into nicely formatted search results:

Cognitive search - AzSearch.js pretty

All what I did was to create HTML template:

    const resultTemplate =
        `<div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-5 col-md-3 result_img">
            <img class="img-responsive result_img" src={{thumbnail}} alt="image not found" />
        </div>
        <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-7 col-md-9">
            <h4>{{displayText}}</h4>
            <div class="resultDescription">
                {{{summary}}}
            </div>
            <div>
                sqft: <b>{{sqft}}</b>
            </div>
            <div>
                beds: <b>{{beds}}</b>
            </div>
            <div>
                baths: <b>{{baths}}</b>
            </div>
            <div>
                key phrases: <b>{{keyPhrases}}</b>
            </div>
        </div>`;

And add it to already present addResults function call:

automagic.addResults("results", { count: true }, resultTemplate);

I also created resultsProcessor to do some custom transformations. I.e., join few fields into one, truncate description to 200 characters, and convert key phrases from array into string separated by commas:

var resultsProcessor = function(results) {
        return results.map(function(result){
            result.displayText = result.number + " " + result.street+ " " +result.city+ ", " +result.region+ " " +result.countryCode;
            var summary = result.description;
            result.summary = summary.length &lt; 200 ? summary : summary.substring(0, 200) + "...";
            result.keyPhrases = result.keyphrases.join(", ");
            return result;
        });
    };
    automagic.store.setResultsProcessor(resultsProcessor);

You can do similar customization with suggestions. You can also add highlights to your results and much more. Everything is described in AzSearch.js README. We also have starter app written with TypeScript and React based on sample real estate data, which takes advantage of more advanced features of AzSearch.js. If you have any questions or suggestions regarding AzSearch.js let me know on Twitter!

Summary

Cognitive Search takes analyzing data with Azure Search to the next level. It takes away the burden of writing your own infrastructure for running AI-based analysis. For more advanced analysis, including OCR on your images, check out our docs. I am super excited to see it in action, and for the next improvements that we are working on. Let us know what do you think!

*This blog post was written in Boeing 787 during my flight from Toronto to São Paulo, when I was on my way to QCon conference.


Add custom metadata to Azure blob storage files and search them with Azure Search

Did you know that you can add custom metadata to your blob containers, and even to individual blob files?

You can do it in the Azure Portal, using SDK or REST API.

The most common scenario is adding metadata during file upload. Below code is uploading sample invoice from disk, and adds year, month, and day metadata properties.

const string StorageAccountName = "";
const string AccountKey = "";
const string ContainerName = "";

string ConnectionString = $"DefaultEndpointsProtocol=https;AccountName={StorageAccountName};AccountKey={AccountKey};EndpointSuffix=core.windows.net";
CloudStorageAccount storageAccount = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(ConnectionString);
CloudBlobClient blobClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudBlobClient();
CloudBlobContainer container = blobClient.GetContainerReference(ContainerName);

const string FileName = "Invoice_2017_01_01";
using (var fileStream = System.IO.File.OpenRead([email protected]"D:\dev\BlobMetadataSample\invoices\{FileName}.pdf"))
{
    var fileNameParts = FileName.Split('_');
    var year = fileNameParts[1];
    var month = fileNameParts[2];
    var day = fileNameParts[3];

    var blob = container.GetBlockBlobReference(FileName);
    blob.Metadata.Add("year", year);
    blob.Metadata.Add("month", month);
    blob.Metadata.Add("day", day);
    blob.UploadFromStream(fileStream);

    var yearFromBlob = blob.Metadata.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Key == "year").Value;
    var monthFromBlob = blob.Metadata.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Key == "month").Value;
    var dayFromBlob = blob.Metadata.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Key == "day").Value;

    Console.WriteLine($"{blob.Name} ({yearFromBlob}-{monthFromBlob}-{dayFromBlob})");
}

If you just want to add metadata to existing blob, instead of calling blob.UploadFromStream(fileStream) you can run blob.SetMetadata().

When you create new index for blob in Azure Search, we will automatically detect these fields. If you already have Azure Search index created, you can add new fields (has to be the same as metadata key), and all changes will be synchronized with next re-indexing.


I am joining Cloud AI team to work on Azure Search

Azure Search

It has been over 3 years since I joined the Azure Portal team. During that time I learned a lot about every aspect of web and mobile development. I delivered over 20 technical talks at different conferences around the World and local meetups. It was amazing to take the new Portal from preview to v1. In the meantime, during the //oneweek hackathon, together with a few other folks, we built a prototype of the Azure Mobile App. After getting feedback from Scott Guthrie who said that “it would be super useful” I started working on the app overnight.

I didn’t know much about mobile development at the time, but I wanted to learn. I didn’t know much about complexities of Active Directory authentication and Azure Resource Manager APIs. I just knew that it would be super cool to have an app that would allow me to check the status of my Azure resources while waiting for my lunch. Receiving a push notification, and being able to scale VM from my phone would be also tremendously valuable.

When I started working on the app full time, my dream came true. I could truly connect my passion with work. I enjoyed the long hours, and late nights we all put to make it happen. The day when Scott Hanselman presented the Azure App at the //build conference was on of the best days of my life.

Now, when the Azure App is released, and backed by great team, I can move to the next challenge.

Machine learning is becoming part of every aspect of our lives. Over last few years, ML crossed a threshold necessary to be extremely useful. I always wanted to be part of it. I took a great Coursera class by Andrew Ng, I started overnight project StockEstimator and I got involved in SeeingAI to learn how Real-World Machine Learning looks like.

Now, I’m taking it to the next level. I am joining Azure Search Team to lead their User Experience. I will be responsible for bringing the product to customers. While using my existing web development knowledge, I will have an amazing opportunity to learn more about Big Data, AI and ML.

Azure Search is managed cloud search service that offers scalable full-text search over multiple languages, geo-spatial search, filtering and faceted navigation, type-ahead queries, hit highlighting, and custom analyzers. You can find more details in this talk by Pablo Castro (Azure Search manager and creator of Open Data Protocol).

The cool thing about working for Microsoft is that you may end up working with person who created HTTP protocol. Henrik Frystyk Nielsen, former Tim Berners-Lee’s student, who shared office with Håkon Wium Lie (creator of CSS), joined my new team this month. What’s even cooler, he is sitting next to me 🙂

In my new office with Henrik:

Henrik Frystyk Nielsen and Jacob Jedryszek

If you want to learn more about all the cool stuff we are doing at Cloud AI group there is an awesome .NET Rocks Podcast with Joseph Sirosh. Check it out!

There is also awesome talk by Joseph from the last Connect(); conference, which includes JFK files demo presented by Corom Thompson from my team (creator of How-Old.NET). In that demo Corom showcases how you can use Azure Search and Cognitive Services to explore JFK files. Super cool! You can see demo in below video, and code on github.

It has never been a better time to work on the intersection of Cloud and Artificial Intelligence!